1. A List of “Men’s Rights” Issues That Feminism Is Already Working On

    Feminists do not want you to lose custody of your children. The assumption that women are naturally better caregivers is part of patriarchy.

    Feminists do not like commercials in which bumbling dads mess up the laundry and competent wives have to bustle in and fix it. The assumption that women are naturally better housekeepers is part of patriarchy.

    Feminists do not want you to have to make alimony payments. Alimony is set up to combat the fact that women have been historically expected to prioritize domestic duties over professional goals, thus minimizing their earning potential if their “traditional” marriages end. The assumption that wives should make babies instead of money is part of patriarchy.

    Feminists do not want anyone to get raped in prison. Permissiveness and jokes about prison rape are part of rape culture, which is part of patriarchy.

    Feminists do not want anyone to be falsely accused of rape. False rape accusations discredit rape victims, which reinforces rape culture, which is part of patriarchy.

    Feminists do not want you to be lonely and we do not hate “nice guys.” The idea that certain people are inherently more valuable than other people because of superficial physical attributes is part of patriarchy.

    Feminists do not want you to have to pay for dinner. We want the opportunity to achieve financial success on par with men in any field we choose (and are qualified for), and the fact that we currently don’t is part of patriarchy. The idea that men should coddle and provide for women, and/or purchase their affections in romantic contexts, is condescending and damaging and part of patriarchy.

    Feminists do not want you to be maimed or killed in industrial accidents, or toil in coal mines while we do cushy secretarial work and various yarn-themed activities. The fact that women have long been shut out of dangerous industrial jobs (by men, by the way) is part of patriarchy.

    Feminists do not want you to commit suicide. Any pressures and expectations that lower the quality of life of any gender are part of patriarchy. The fact that depression is characterized as an effeminate weakness, making men less likely to seek treatment, is part of patriarchy.

    Feminists do not want you to be viewed with suspicion when you take your child to the park (men frequently insist that this is a serious issue, so I will take them at their word). The assumption that men are insatiable sexual animals, combined with the idea that it’s unnatural for men to care for children, is part of patriarchy.

    Feminists do not want you to be drafted and then die in a war while we stay home and iron stuff. The idea that women are too weak to fight or too delicate to function in a military setting is part of patriarchy.

    Feminists do not want women to escape prosecution on legitimate domestic violence charges, nor do we want men to be ridiculed for being raped or abused. The idea that women are naturally gentle and compliant and that victimhood is inherently feminine is part of patriarchy.

    Feminists hate patriarchy. We do not hate you.

    If you really care about those issues as passionately as you say you do, you should be thanking feminists, because feminism is a social movement actively dedicated to dismantling every single one of them. The fact that you blame feminists—your allies—for problems against which they have been struggling for decades suggests that supporting men isn’t nearly as important to you as resenting women. We care about your problems a lot. Could you try caring about ours?

    Excerpt from If I Admit That Hating Men is a Thing, Will You Stop Turning it Into a Self-fulfilling Prophecy?, by Lindy West  (via lilac-time)

    fucking THANK YOU

    (via you-idiot-kid)

    this is a BIG thing that men don’t get about feminism and patriarchy. 

    (via middleschooltrackstar)

    I’ve reblogged this before but it bears repeating

    (via manicscribble)

    Everyone. Please read this. Please just stop what you’re doing, and please read this. This is so critical, so important. Please read. 

    (via theyoungblackfeminist)

    Reblogged from: namidakills
  2. The idea that intelligence is linked to English pronunciation is a legacy from colonial thinking.
     Delalorm Semabia, 25, a Ghanaian blogger (x) @yasminabdulqadi (via arnaib)
    Reblogged from: tonyespera
  3. As the youngest winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, it’s difficult to think of who could inspire Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani education advocate who has become a global icon for girls’ education. But there’s one teen girl who inspires her.

    At 18 years old, Anoyara Khatun from India’s West Bengal has helped reunite more than 180 trafficked children with their families, prevented 35 child marriages, rescued 85 children from the clutches of child labor and registered 200 students into schools, according to the Malala Fund.
    Reblogged from: micdotcom
  4. Nowadays the princesses all know kung fu, and yet they’re still the same princesses. They’re still love interests, still the one girl in a team of five boys, and they’re all kind of the same. They march on screen, punch someone to show how they don’t take no shit, throw around a couple of one-liners or forcibly kiss someone because getting consent is for wimps, and then with ladylike discretion they back out of the narrative’s way.

    On the posters they’re posed way in the back of the shot behind the men, in the trailers they may pout or smile or kick things, but they remain silent. Their strength lets them, briefly, dominate bystanders but never dominate the plot. It’s an anodyne, a sop, a Trojan Horse - it’s there to distract and confuse you, so you forget to ask for more.

    Sophia McDougall  (via feministquotes)
    Reblogged from: falloutboyonboy
  5. Almost half, 13 mothers, were given 20 years or more. In one case, the mother was given a life sentence for failing to protect her son, just like the man who murdered the infant boy. In another, the sentences were effectively the same: The killer got life, and the mother got 75 years, of which she must serve at least 63 years and nine months. In yet another, the mother got a longer sentence than the man who raped her son. In one more, a father fractured an infant girl’s toe, femur, and seven ribs and was sentenced to two years; for failing to intervene, the mother got 30.
    Reblogged from: humanrightswatch
  6. Developers and writers alike want games about more things, and games by more people. We want — and we are getting, and will keep getting — tragicomedy, vignette, musicals, dream worlds, family tales, ethnographies, abstract art. We will get this, because we’re creating culture now. We are refusing to let anyone feel prohibited from participating.

    “Gamer” isn’t just a dated demographic label that most people increasingly prefer not to use. Gamers are over. That’s why they’re so mad.

    Leigh killing it. Read the rest (via kierongillen)
    Reblogged from: tentakrule
  7. The difference with a single player game is that in the same way you lose yourself in a good novel, you can lose yourself in a single player story. You see it in all these games, where you can fill your house with turnips or decorate your armor with a dragon skull. It lets you go inside for a little while and, well, not hermit up necessarily, but be in another place and time for a while. It is escapism and you can’t really have that when ‘BonerLord247’ goes running past you in the middle of a raid.
    Reblogged from: elleblr
  8. Unfortunately, not paying attention to race and gender does not make gender-race inequalities go away, precisely because these inequalities are institutionalized and not just ideas in people’s heads.
    Evelyn Nakano Glenn, Chapter 1: The Social Construction and Institutionalization of Gender and Race in Revisioning Gender (via aswekissgoodbye)
    Reblogged from: quigonejinn
  9. I first wound up in a panel of women who do fan art and fan fiction surrounding the current TV incarnation of Teen Wolf. And you know what they were like? They were a lot like every other panel of geeky young writers I’ve ever seen. They spoke intelligently and thoughtfully about writing and creativity and what they like and don’t like to make art about. They talked about the responsibility they feel when they write about mental illness and thoughtfully chewed over the idea of creating transgender characters to add to what’s sort of a preexisting universe. They rolled their eyes at a video that was circulating in which Teen Wolf actors were placed on the spot and asked to read fan fiction aloud for yuks, shrugging it off as a cheap effort to make actors uncomfortable on camera and get them to dump on their own fans.
    Linda Holmes, an NPR writer who apparently stumbled into our panel last Friday totally by accident and said the nicest words ever uttered about me and my six new best friends by a total stranger (via magneticwave)
    Reblogged from: thejerseydevile
  10. You’re not a bad person for the ways you tried to kill your sadness.
    (via melisica)
    Reblogged from: reiish
  11. Don’t you dare
    Shrink yourself
    For someone else’s comfort -
    Do not become small
    For people who refuse to grow.
    m.v., Advice to my future daughter, #2.  (via efidelity)
    Reblogged from: suchirolle
  12. A federal judge on Monday issued an injunction barring police from enforcing what became known as “the five-second rule,” in which protesters in Ferguson, Missouri could only stay still for that brief amount of time. U.S. District Court Judge Catherine Perry ruled that the statute was unconstitutional because it violated protesters’ freedom of speech rights, as well as due process.

    “[T]he policy fails to provide sufficient notice of what is illegal and because it was enforced arbitrarily,” wrote Perry in response to a case brought by the ACLU.

    In the aftermath of unarmed, black teen Michael Brown’s shooting death at the hands of a white Ferguson police officer, local police commonly relied on the rule as a crowd control tactic and even insisted that reporters had to be in the media staging area or keep walking. It led to one of the defining images from nights of upheaval in Ferguson: Bands of protesters marching along city streets, helping those who were elderly stay moving.

    Tony Rothert, legal director of the ACLU of Missouri, noted that such rules tend to increase tension when applied “haphazardly.” He add that “Judge Perry’s injunction is a huge win for peaceful protesters and those who believe in the rule of law.”

    The police-enforced rule also prevented people from gathering on sidewalks, which also violated freedom of speech, according to Perry’s ruling.

    “Citizens who wish to gather in the wake of Michael Brown’s tragic death have a constitutional right to do so, but they do not have the right to endanger lives of police officers or other citizens,” Perry wrote, adding that the ruling still allows officers to enforce refusal-to-disperse laws, one of the most commonly used charges used to arrest protesters in Ferguson. “The police must be able to perform their jobs, and nothing in this order restricts their ability to do that.”

    Reblogged from: iamtehzuul
  13. "My response to the “I am not a feminist” internet phenomenon….

    First of all, it’s clear you don’t know what feminism is. But I’m not going to explain it to you. You can google it. To quote an old friend, “I’m not the feminist babysitter.”

    But here is what I think you should know.

    You’re insulting every woman who was forcibly restrained in a jail cell with a feeding tube down her throat for your right to vote, less than 100 years ago.

    You’re degrading every woman who has accessed a rape crisis center, which wouldn’t exist without the feminist movement.

    You’re undermining every woman who fought to make marital rape a crime (it was legal until 1993).

    You’re spitting on the legacy of every woman who fought for women to be allowed to own property (1848). For the abolition of slavery and the rise of the labor union. For the right to divorce. For women to be allowed to have access to birth control (Comstock laws). For middle and upper class women to be allowed to work outside the home (poor women have always worked outside the home). To make domestic violence a crime in the US (It is very much legal in many parts of the world). To make workplace sexual harassment a crime.

    In short, you know not what you speak of. You reap the rewards of these women’s sacrifices every day of your life. When you grin with your cutsey sign about how you’re not a feminist, you ignorantly spit on the sacred struggle of the past 200 years. You bite the hand that has fed you freedom, safety, and a voice.

    In short, kiss my ass, you ignorant little jerks.”

    Libby Anne (via coachk13)
    Reblogged from: wreckingbally
  14. The Big Bang Theory shows geek culture the same way that 50 Shades of Grey shows BDSM culture.

    (via dezi-desire)

    OH MY GOD YOU PUT IT INTO WORDS. THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU.

    (via benaddicted4life)

    Reblogged from: sumomomochi
  15. She recognized that that is how friendships begin: one person reveals a moment of strangeness, and the other person decides to just listen and not exploit it.
    The Interestings, Meg Wolitzer (via middlechildcomplex)
    Reblogged from: audreymgonzalez
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