1. Love isn’t soft, like those poets say. Love has teeth which bite and the wounds never close.
    Stephen King (via loveage-moondream)
    Reblogged from: eyecandybutts
  2. Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.
    Winston Churchill
    Reblogged from: onlinecounsellingcollege
  3. Look, y’all know that we here on The Mary Sue are not particularly huge Twilight fans (though the way hatred of it so often boils down to “Look at these stupid teenage girls with their stupid teenage girl minds and their stupid teenage girl things that they like” is, in my own personal view, reprehensible). They’re poorly written, and, oh yeah, promote a relationship ideal that’s actually extremely abusive. But. We know that female directors are an underrepresented group in film and TV, that “the whole system is geared for them to fail.” If you don’t know that, read up a bit and get back to me. So the fact that Lionsgate is taking proactive steps in supporting the career development of young female directors is deserving of some kudos. A bad series did a good thing.
    Reblogged from: themarysue
  4. I wonder if it would have been considered acceptable to anchor a medical report on heart disease solely in terms of its costs to employers – to headline a news story on cancer treatment with the words “working days lost to cancer”. I suspect not. While economic reporting on various vaguely defined patient groups is certainly becoming prevalent, I believe both medical professionals and news editors would feel compelled to include a more patient-based approach when reporting on what a friend has astutely called “X-rayable diseases”. I certainly hope they would not dream of telling the nation on the first page of the report what percentage of “the national disease burden” they form – which is what the CMO does, lumping all mental health issues together. It would be considered inexcusably insensitive.

    Coping with mental illness can include feelings of self-blame, inadequacy and failure. It did for me, and does for many people I know. The economic commoditisation of human pain is dangerously close to victim-blaming. Such an approach can send the destructive message: see how much money you cost everyone, you broken person? Its dark heart is that the state’s only interest in its citizens is as economic units, occasionally broken and in need of quick and efficient repair, in order to slot back into the corporate design.
    Reblogged from: roachpatrol
  5. I mean, aren’t white punks always complaining about “blue hair” discrimination, as if a jar of Manic Panic magically re-positioned their own social status on some level of “equally” marginal footing with people of color? And where does that leave the rest of us who cannot wash our colors away?

    mimi thi nguyen - saying fuck you to the sexualized orientalist gaze (via schizometrics)

    White people who are into body mod constantly pull this shit. People staring at your piercings and tattoos is not the same as dealing with institutionalized oppression, you soggy waffles. 

    (via titspirationall)

    Reblogged from: tonyespera
  6. When it comes to sex, feminists get a bad (and confusing) rep. We’re both man-haters and whores, unmarryable spinsters and family-destroyers. We purportedly want to outlaw pornography while encouraging adolescent girls to get on the pill. We’re hideous hairy-legged lesbians, and we’re using undergraduate Women’s Studies programs to turn your daughter bisexual. We’re promiscuous oversexed sluts, and we’re angry femi-Nazis because we’re not getting laid.

    Critics can’t decide if feminists hate sex or are having too much of it.
    Reblogged from: micdotcom
  7. I used to be married to a woman. Before that I had had a relationship with a man. I then had another relationship with a woman, and I since then have had relationships with men. I still would define myself as bisexual partly because that’s how I feel but also because I think it’s important to — I think sexuality in this country especially is seen as a very black and white thing, and I think we should encourage the gray. You know?
    Alan Cumming (x)
    Reblogged from: queerboochananbarnes
  8. So anyway, I was having this argument with my father about Martin Luther King and how his message was too conservative compared to Malcolm X’s message. My father got really angry at me. It wasn’t that he disliked Malcolm X, but his point was that Malcolm X hadn’t accomplished anything as Dr. King had.

    I was kind of sarcastic and asked something like, so what did Martin Luther King accomplish other than giving his “I have a dream speech.”

    Before I tell you what my father told me, I want to digress. Because at this point in our amnesiac national existence, my question pretty much reflects the national civic religion view of what Dr. King accomplished. He gave this great speech. Or some people say, “he marched.” I was so angry at Mrs. Clinton during the primaries when she said that Dr. King marched, but it was LBJ who delivered the Civil Rights Act.

    At this point, I would like to remind everyone exactly what Martin Luther King did, and it wasn’t that he “marched” or gave a great speech.

    My father told me with a sort of cold fury, “Dr. King ended the terror of living in the south.”

    Please let this sink in and and take my word and the word of my late father on this. If you are a white person who has always lived in the U.S. and never under a brutal dictatorship, you probably don’t know what my father was talking about.

    But this is what the great Dr. Martin Luther King accomplished. Not that he marched, nor that he gave speeches.

    He ended the terror of living as a black person, especially in the south.

    I’m guessing that most of you, especially those having come fresh from seeing The Help, may not understand what this was all about. But living in the south (and in parts of the midwest and in many ghettos of the north) was living under terrorism.

    It wasn’t that black people had to use a separate drinking fountain or couldn’t sit at lunch counters, or had to sit in the back of the bus.

    You really must disabuse yourself of this idea. Lunch counters and buses were crucial symbolic planes of struggle that the civil rights movement used to dramatize the issue, but the main suffering in the south did not come from our inability to drink from the same fountain, ride in the front of the bus or eat lunch at Woolworth’s.

    It was that white people, mostly white men, occasionally went berserk, and grabbed random black people, usually men, and lynched them. You all know about lynching. But you may forget or not know that white people also randomly beat black people, and the black people could not fight back, for fear of even worse punishment.

    This constant low level dread of atavistic violence is what kept the system running. It made life miserable, stressful and terrifying for black people.

    White people also occasionally tried black people, especially black men, for crimes for which they could not conceivably be guilty. With the willing participation of white women, they often accused black men of “assault,” which could be anything from rape to not taking off one’s hat, to “reckless eyeballing.”

    This is going to sound awful and perhaps a stain on my late father’s memory, but when I was little, before the civil rights movement, my father taught me many, many humiliating practices in order to prevent the random, terroristic, berserk behavior of white people. The one I remember most is that when walking down the street in New York City side by side, hand in hand with my hero-father, if a white woman approached on the same sidewalk, I was to take off my hat and walk behind my father, because he had been taught in the south that black males for some reason were supposed to walk single file in the presence of any white lady.

    This was just one of many humiliating practices we were taught to prevent white people from going berserk.

    I remember a huge family reunion one August with my aunts and uncles and cousins gathered around my grandparents’ vast breakfast table laden with food from the farm, and the state troopers drove up to the house with a car full of rifles and shotguns, and everyone went kind of weirdly blank. They put on the masks that black people used back then to not provoke white berserkness. My strong, valiant, self-educated, articulate uncles, whom I adored, became shuffling, Step-N-Fetchits to avoid provoking the white men. Fortunately the troopers were only looking for an escaped convict. Afterward, the women, my aunts, were furious at the humiliating performance of the men, and said so, something that even a child could understand.

    This is the climate of fear that Dr. King ended.

    If you didn’t get taught such things, let alone experience them, I caution you against invoking the memory of Dr. King as though he belongs exclusively to you and not primarily to African Americans.

    The question is, how did Dr. King do this—and of course, he didn’t do it alone.

    (Of all the other civil rights leaders who helped Dr. King end this reign of terror, I think the most under appreciated is James Farmer, who founded the Congress of Racial Equality and was a leader of nonviolent resistance, and taught the practices of nonviolent resistance.)

    So what did they do?

    They told us: Whatever you are most afraid of doing vis-a-vis white people, go do it. Go ahead down to city hall and try to register to vote, even if they say no, even if they take your name down.

    Go ahead sit at that lunch counter. Sue the local school board. All things that most black people would have said back then, without exaggeration, were stark raving insane and would get you killed.

    If we do it all together, we’ll be okay.

    They made black people experience the worst of the worst, collectively, that white people could dish out, and discover that it wasn’t that bad. They taught black people how to take a beating—from the southern cops, from police dogs, from fire department hoses. They actually coached young people how to crouch, cover their heads with their arms and take the beating. They taught people how to go to jail, which terrified most decent people.

    And you know what? The worst of the worst, wasn’t that bad.

    Once people had been beaten, had dogs sicced on them, had fire hoses sprayed on them, and been thrown in jail, you know what happened?

    These magnificent young black people began singing freedom songs in jail.

    That, my friends, is what ended the terrorism of the south. Confronting your worst fears, living through it, and breaking out in a deep throated freedom song. The jailers knew they had lost when they beat the crap out of these young Negroes and the jailed, beaten young people began to sing joyously, first in one town then in another. This is what the writer, James Baldwin, captured like no other writer of the era.

    Please let this sink in. It wasn’t marches or speeches. It was taking a severe beating, surviving and realizing that our fears were mostly illusory and that we were free.

    Daily Kos :: Most of you have no idea what Martin Luther King actually did 

    Reblogging this so I can come back to it in the spring when I teach the Civil Rights Movement to my 5th graders. 

    (via copperoranges)

    Reblogging this for all the non-black people who like to quote MLK like he’s theirs.

    (via heathenist)

    Reblogged from: laurazel
  9. This is how thoroughly we women have been sexualized, that we cannot make the kind of noises that come with physical exertion without it being associated with sex. In fact, everything about our bodies has been sexualized in one way or another. If we groan during sport or we breast-feed in public, we are criticized for making people think about sex. If we talk openly about things like menstruation and poop and farts, then we are criticized for making people not want to think about sex.

    Think about what it means to be ladylike and all of the adjectives that go along with it: elegant, cultured, classy, sophisticated. To be successful at being feminine means being successful at being private, keeping your body’s natural functions behind closed doors and never letting anyone know they exist. It means to be constrained, that you do not let your legs spread wide in public transportation and you do not make noises that are harsh on the ears. It means presenting a polished, shiny surface to the world at all times, one that allows others to project whatever they wish onto you while never showing too much of your true self.
    Reblogged from: captwingcdr
  10. 'Coercive passing' can be thought of as an alternative term to 'invisibility.' Whereas invisibility suggests that one is simply “unseen” in their marginalized identity, the concept of coercive passing suggests that one isn't simply invisible but actively perceived as something other than they experience themselves to be (as influenced by social construction and power hierarchies). Thus, being 'invisible' in fact means being actively, coercively passed off as a member of the default/hegemonic group, entailing erasure as well as more subtle forms of oppression.

    This is particularly relevant to the concept of bisexual invisibility — taken from this perspective, it’s easy to understand that bisexuality and bisexual people are not invisible, but are being actively and coercively erased.

    Bi: Notes for a Bisexual Revolution (p. 107) by Shiri Eisner (bidyke.tumblr.com and radicalbi.wordpress.com)

    This came up on my dash and it’s totally relevant for Bi Visibility Week

    (via bidyke)

    Reblogged from: zetsubonna
  11. Let me tell you some things.

    I used to investigate child abuse and neglect. I can tell you how to stop the vast majority of abortion in the world.

    First, make knowledge and access to contraception widely available. Start teaching kids before they hit puberty. Teach them about domestic violence and coercion, and teach them not to coerce and rape. Create a strong, loving community where women and girls feel safe and supported in times of need. Because guess what? They aren’t. You know what happens to babies born under such circumstances? They get hurt, unnecessarily. They get sick, unnecessarily. They get removed from parents who love them but who are unprepared for the burden of a child. Resources? Honey, we try. There aren’t enough resources anywhere. There are waiting lists, and promises, and maybes. If the government itself can’t hook people up, what makes you think an impoverished single mom can handle it?

    Abolish poverty. Do you have any idea how much childcare costs? Daycare can cost as much or more than monthly rent. They may be inadequately staffed. Getting a private nanny is a nice idea, but they don’t come cheap either. Relatives? Do they own a car? Does the bus run at the right times? Do they have jobs of their own they need to work just to keep the lights on? Are they going to stick around until you get off you convenience store shift at 4 AM? Do they have criminal histories that will make them unsuitable as caregivers when CPS pokes around? You gonna pay for that? Who’s going to pay for that?

    End rape. I know your type errs on the side of blaming the woman, but I’ve seen little girls who’ve barely gotten their periods pregnant because somebody thought raping preteens was an awesome idea. You want to put a child through that? Or someone with a mental or physical inability for whom pregnancy would be frightening, painful or even life-threatening? I’ve seen nonverbal kids who had their feet sliced up by caregivers for no fucking reason at all, you think sexual abuse doesn’t happen either?

    You say there’s lots of couples who want to adopt. Kiddo, what they want to adopt are healthy white babies, preferably untainted by the wombs and genetics of women with alcohol or drug dependencies. I’ve seen the kids they don’t want, who almost no one wants. You people focus only on the happy pink babies, the gigglers, the ones who grow and grow with no trouble. Those are not the kids who linger in foster care. Those are certainly not the older kids and teenagers who age out of foster care and then are thrown out in the streets, usually with an array of medical and mental health issues. Are they too old to count?

    And yeah, I’ve seen the babies, little hand-sized things barely clinging to life. There’s no glory, no wonder there. There is no wonder in a pregnant woman with five dollars to her name, so deep in depression you wonder if she’ll be alive in a week. Therapy costs money. Medicine costs money. Food, clothes, electricity cost money. Government assistance is a pittance; poverty drives women and girls into situations where they are forced to rely on people who abuse them to survive. (I’ve been up in more hospitals than I can count.)

    In each and every dark pit of desperation, I have never seen a pro-lifer. I ain’t never seen them babysitting, scrubbing floors, bringing over goods, handing mom $50 bucks a month or driving her to the pediatrician. I ain’t never seen them sitting up for hours with an autistic child who screams and rages so his mother can get some sleep while she rests up from working 14-hour days. I don’t see them fixing leaks in rundown houses or playing with a kid while the police prepare to interview her about her sexual abuse. They’re not paying for the funerals of babies and children who died after birth, when they truly do become independent organisms. And the crazy thing is they think they’ve already done their job, because the child was born!

    Aphids give birth, girl. It’s no miracle. You want to speak for the weak? Get off your high horse and get your hands dirty helping the poor, the isolated, the ill and mentally ill women and mothers and their children who already breathe the dirty air. You are doing nothing, absolutely nothing, for children. You don’t have a flea’s comprehension of injustice. You are not doing shit for life until you get in there and fight that darkness. Until you understand that abortion is salvation in a world like ours. Does that sound too hard? Do you really think suffering post-birth is more permissible, less worthy of outrage?

    “Pro-life” is simply a philosophy in which the only life worth saving is the one that can be saved by punishing a woman.

    In reply to a ‘pro-life’ blogger: STFU, Conservatives: When I say I’m pro-life… (via grrrltalk) emphasis mine. (via fuckyeahfeminists)

    Anti-choice

    (via kaosafro)

    Reblogged from: pokeballssohard
  12. So here’s the thing – this country’s cultural pie gets bigger, not smaller, as more people are allowed to partake of it. When children and young adults see their lives and concerns reflected in the homegrown books they read, the films and television programmes they see, the computer games they play, they feel they and their lives are not invisible. Seeing yourself in the cultural world leads to a sense of better social inclusion and a feeling that you are part of something, that you have a stake in it and wish to add constructively to it. For some – like me when I read The Color Purple at the age of 21 – it plants the seed of an idea that maybe you too could be a part of the rich cultural heritage of your country.
    Reblogged from: welcometothetrickmurkcircus
  13. When all else fails, throw the gnome.
    Literally our campaign’s last ditch strategy against everything. (via outofcontextdnd)
    Reblogged from: spookypidgey
  14. Don’t bother apologizing if you’re just going to continue doing the things you said sorry for.
    Reblogged from: minh-tam
  15. There are accepted revolutions, revolutions which are called revolutions; there are refused revolutions, which are called riots.

    Les Miserables Volume 5, Book 1, Chapter 20 (via rrosejonathanselavy)

    Ferguson.

    (via 4capproved)

    Reblogged from: iwilleatyourenglish
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