1. gunmetal-blue:

    image
    In 1973 an arsonist firebombed a gay bar in New Orleans where a Metropolitan Community Church fundraiser was being held.

    32 men and women died in the fire. 

    It remains the deadliest crime against an LGBT population in US history. 40 years later, at long last, the victims’ stories are finally being told.

    The Up Stairs Lounge fire is as much a part of the LGBTQ rights story as Stonewall, Harvey Milk, the AIDS Quilt, and Prop 8. It is a story that needs to be told, and it needs to be remembered.

    Playwright Wayne Self has written a compelling dramatic musical with a modern score steeped in the jazz and blues of New Orleans to tell the story. A workshop production in San Francisco in February paves the way for a full production this summer. 

    You can help make that production a reality, and bring Upstairs to New Orleans for the 40th anniversary of the fire this June.

    For all you peeps in SF, check this out: nezumiko, one of my dearest friends, is the director for this here play. He’s crazy talented and passionate about this as all hell, and he needs to get the word out. Even if you aren’t going, I’d really, really appreciate it if you’d signal boost. 

    Reblogged from: gunmetal-blue
  2. image
    In 1973 an arsonist firebombed a gay bar in New Orleans where a Metropolitan Community Church fundraiser was being held.

    32 men and women died in the fire. 

    It remains the deadliest crime against an LGBT population in US history. 40 years later, at long last, the victims’ stories are finally being told.

    The Up Stairs Lounge fire is as much a part of the LGBTQ rights story as Stonewall, Harvey Milk, the AIDS Quilt, and Prop 8. It is a story that needs to be told, and it needs to be remembered.

    Playwright Wayne Self has written a compelling dramatic musical with a modern score steeped in the jazz and blues of New Orleans to tell the story. A workshop production in San Francisco in February paves the way for a full production this summer. 

    You can help make that production a reality, and bring Upstairs to New Orleans for the 40th anniversary of the fire this June.

    For all you peeps in SF, check this out: nezumiko, one of my dearest friends, is the director for this here play. He’s crazy talented and passionate about this as all hell, and he needs to get the word out. Even if you aren’t going, I’d really, really appreciate it if you’d signal boost. 

  3. fromonesurvivortoanother:

    a massively successful, new york times bestselling American writer can’t even invite his parents to the premiere of one of his works because the last time he saw them they threatened to kill him 

    Reblogged from: fromonesurvivortoanother
  4. teeveedinner:

    “The Office of Human Rights transgender and gender identity non-discrimination campaign will appear throughout DC in Fall and Winter of 2012. The campaign will feature five transgender or gender non-conforming people in a series of five ads. The campaign aims to increase understanding of the community, reduce discriminatory incidents in DC and increase reporting of discrimination when it happens.”

    just saw this on facebook https://www.facebook.com/DCOHR
    <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 
    Reblogged from: kianalvane
  5. amillionmilesaway00:

gaywrites:

“Marriage equality is now a mainstream value.” For a bigger picture, click here. 

MARRIAGE EQUALITY NOW!

    amillionmilesaway00:

    gaywrites:

    “Marriage equality is now a mainstream value.” For a bigger picture, click here

    MARRIAGE EQUALITY NOW!

    Reblogged from: hangeyzoe
  6. Reblogged from: redbrunja
  7. janetmock:

    It’s rare that trans women are given the mic to speak about our experiences on our own terms, and it’s an even rarer occurrence when we women of color get to share space with one another and truth tell in a public space.

    I’m proud of the nearly 10 minutes I shared with Isis King, who came into the media’s focus when she was recruited to compete on Cycle 11 of America’s Next Top Model in 2008. I’m proud to call Isis my dear sister and to be able to speak with her about our public lives.

    For In The Life Media’s landmark 20th season, Isis and I discuss living visibly as trans women, our personal experiences in the media and our views on “tranny” and divisive trans terminology.

    I’d like to use this space to clarify three things:

    1. Isis mentioned Laverne Cox as one of the only examples she’s known of trans women like herself on television. I’d like to highlight the fact that other sisters are and have also represented on television: Carmen Carrera, Candis Cayne, Jamie Clayton, Nina Poon, Harmony Santana and Nong Ariyaphon Southiphong.

    2. I made a statement about our responsibility to educate others about our experiences. I said, “You have to use your life as a teaching moment.” It’s a personal choice to do so, and it’s a responsibility that I take on, but it is NOT our job to educate people about us. I was reminded of this when I read Janani Balasubramanian’s essay “Brown Silence,” where she so eloquently writes: “Not everyone’s education needs to be our responsibility all the time…Our words and energy should also be conserved.”

    3. I also said the dehumanization of trans women in the media “leads to trans women hurting themselves in a way that they feel they don’t deserve more.” Instead, I’d like to add that the systematic dehumanization of trans women through words, images and the lack thereof of words and images that represent the totality of our experiences actually is what contributes to others seeing us as less than human therefore justifying the violence, battery, criminalization and murders we face. 

    Finally, I hope conversations like these continue to happen, and that they happen with a wide array of women, because it’s only in hearing a plethora of our voices do we paint a more realistic portrait of womanhood. 

    Reblogged from: safespacenetwork
  8. edinburghsexpression:

    Welcome to the second post in our Sex 101 series, where we try & cover all the basics of sex & relationships! This post is going to be on the topic of gender identity, including trans* identities, intersexuality & how to be a good ally. If you’d like to see other posts in the series, including our first post on the subject of consent, you can find them here

    If you’d like to suggest a topic for us to cover in Sex 101, or if you’d like to ask us a question about anything relating to sex or relationships then our ask box is always open.

    This post has a trigger warning on it for discussion of issues surrounding gender identity including but not limited to transgenderism & intersexuality.

    If you are questioning your gender identity & feel in need of support there are plenty of great organisations across the UK who can help, & you can find a list of them here.

    Here are the questions:

    What is gender identity?

    Gender identity is the 100% personal & subjective experience that someone has of their own gender. 

    So, it’s whether someone feels male or female?

    Not really. Although some people may identify as male or female, man or woman, there are plenty of other gender identities out there, some of which are on the male-female spectrum, & some of which aren’t. All of these are 100% valid, & the gender binary is a really out-dated way of looking at gender, which can be really harmful towards people who identify as trans* as it basically erases them & their identities.

    So it’s not the same as sex? Or orientation?

    Again, no.

    The word ‘sex’ is generally used to describe a variety of biological differences between males & females, such as genitalia, chromosomes, & hormone levels. However, just as with gender, it’s important to realise that sex is not a binary. The number of people who are intersex is very high, & intersexuality covers a wide range of conditions, for example atypical genitalia or hormone levels, or unusual chromosome combinations. Sex has nothing to do with gender. Someone can have a “vagina”, XX chromosomes, & high estrogen levels, & still be a man, & the same goes for women with “penises”, XY chromosomes, & high levels of testosterone.

    Orientation refers to who someone is romantically & sexually attracted to. Again, this has nothing to do with gender, except in the sense that someone’s gender identity may influence what term they use to describe their orientation. For example, someone who identifies as female & who is attracted to other women might choose to describe their sexual orientation as homosexual, whereas if they were to identify as male, they could identify as heterosexual. Basically, people of all genders can be attracted to people of all genders.

    What does cisgender mean?

    Cisgender is usually used to describe someone who identifies with the sex & or gender that they were assigned at birth. So, if someone was assigned female at birth & currently identifies as female or a woman, they could be described as being cisgender.

    What about transgender?

    Transgender refers to someone who does not identify with the sex & or gender they were assigned at birth. However, it is generally used to describe someone who does identify with one of the two gender in the gender binary.

    Is that the same as trans*?

    Trans* is a more inclusive umbrella term, which can be used by people who identify as transgender, but also anyone who is gender variant or does not identify with the gender binary. This covers a wide range of gender identities, including but not limited to transsexual, genderqueer, non-binary, genderfluid, genderfuck, intersex, third gender, transvestite, cross-dressing, bi-gender, & agender. 

    A lot of these gender identities may be new to people, & there are some terms which are used a lot in discussions about gender which people might not be sure about, so we’ve compiled a glossary of terms relating to gender identity which you can find here. We’ll be adding this to our glossary page, & if you have any suggestions for additions, feel free to message us. It’s important to remember that gender identity is an incredibly personal & fluid thing & while someone may identify using one or several of the terms below their experience may differ from the description given & that’s fine. These are only intended as guidelines.

    What about the word tranny/she-male/hermaphrodite/he-she etc.?

    All of these words have, in the past, been used in a derogatory way & have hurt many people. Because of this, you must be very careful how you use them. In some cases, these words have been reclaimed & that’s great but remember: you can only use them if you are part of the group which has been oppressed by the word, & while it’s ok to use them to describe yourself you should never apply them to anyone else, as they can still be hurtful.

    How do I tell what gender someone is?

    It’s not really any of your business how someone identifies - you don’t need to know & asking can be extremely insulting. If someone wants you to know what gender they identify as, they will let you know. Not prying is part of being a good ally.

    A question that you may need to ask someone is about which pronouns they prefer, although remember that pronouns don’t always indicate gender. 

    The best way to find out what pronouns someone prefers is simply to wait until they refer to themselves, & in the mean time just refer to them using neutral pronouns i.e. they & their.

    If you are in a position where you need to know which pronouns someone prefers, first understand that it’s a very personal & sensitive issue, especially if they are attempting to present as one of the binary genders (this could suggest to them that they are not passing as the gender they wish to present as). They may also not be comfortable talking about their gender identity, either with you or in front of people, particularly if they are in a situation where doing so could put them in danger.

    With that in mind, here’s a guide to opening up a dialogue with someone about their preferred pronouns:

    • Take them aside or wait until the two of you are out of ear shot of others.
    • Make it clear that they don’t have to answer if they are not comfortable doing so.
    • Politely ask “What are your preferred pronouns?”. This question has nothing to do with their sex, or even really their gender, so do not phrase the question in a way which makes it about those things.
    • Respect their answer (use their preferred pronoun at all times & if you make a mistake, apologise immediately), thank them, & move on. 

    My friend or partner has just come out as trans*, what can I do to support them? How can I be a good trans* ally?

    The short answer is: pretty much the same way you go about being a good friend or partner to anyone.

    The longer answer is:

    • Be supportive - this means respecting them & the choices they make. Make sure they know you’re there for them & listen to what they have to say. Coming out as trans* & transitioning can be a tough time for a lot of people so they may be looking for someone they can depend on & talk through their problems with.
    • Part of being a good trans* ally is about educating yourself. There are tons of great resources online regarding trans* identities, & taking the time to educate yourself can take a lot of pressure off trans* people, especially if you’re close to them. Coming out can be tough enough without feeling like you have to explain yourself. If you have any questions, feel free to ask them but be sensitive & respect them if they don’t want to answer.
    • Take note of their preferred pronouns - for advice on how to ask, see above. You should also check when you should use these pronouns. Especially if the trans* person is your partner or close friend, it’s possible they have come out to you & not to others, so by checking when to use which pronouns you can avoid outing them. Outing someone is a terrible thing to do & can put people in danger. Never do it. Personal information given to you in confidence is not to be shared, & if you’re not sure whether someone knows or not, don’t share with them until you’ve had confirmation.
    • It’s understandable if you want to ask questions about the future, for example whether they plan on transitioning & if so how, but again, understand these are personal questions & ones they themselves may not know the answer to, so don’t pressure them.
    • More broadly, part of being a good trans* ally is challenging your own assumptions of gender, & working to break down the gender binary. You can do this by not assuming people’s gender, using gender neutral pronouns unless you know someone’s preferred ones, avoiding making links between gender & sexual orientation, & not defining things like clothing & hairstyles as masculine or feminine. 

    So, remember, gender identity is 100% subjective, 100% personal & 100% none of your business. As with all things in life, be respectful, educate & challenge yourself & others, & be supportive.

    If you have anything to add or any changes to suggest we’d love to hear them & you can send them here. Our glossary of gender terms is here & we’ll be adding them to our main glossary as soon as possible.

    Reblogged from: fuckyeahsexeducation
  9. (safespacenetwork is a site for LGBTQQ and other individuals to share resources and information without fear of harassment.)

  10. nezumiko:

These two gentlemen are two of my dearest friends. I’m blessed to have them in my life. Here’s what the one on the left, a Christian minister of music and former seminarian, had to say about this photo:

There’s an urge in humans to mar all the beauty we can’t possess, control, or monetize. Some people succumb to this urge, some fetishize it, some openly worship it. But no right-wing Satanist’s perversion of Jesus can take away the 18 great years I’ve had with my partner for life. No sociopathic or confused attempt to make indifference into a moral imperative can stop the sunrise or end the breeze. No encyclical from our addled, isolated sages can end the music of laughter at their expense.
 Wage miserable war against them and you become their success. Resist them with a defiant smile and you prove that they can’t ever really win.

Happy 18th Anniversary, guys!

    nezumiko:

    These two gentlemen are two of my dearest friends. I’m blessed to have them in my life. Here’s what the one on the left, a Christian minister of music and former seminarian, had to say about this photo:

    There’s an urge in humans to mar all the beauty we can’t possess, control, or monetize. Some people succumb to this urge, some fetishize it, some openly worship it. But no right-wing Satanist’s perversion of Jesus can take away the 18 great years I’ve had with my partner for life. No sociopathic or confused attempt to make indifference into a moral imperative can stop the sunrise or end the breeze. No encyclical from our addled, isolated sages can end the music of laughter at their expense.

    Wage miserable war against them and you become their success. Resist them with a defiant smile and you prove that they can’t ever really win.

    Happy 18th Anniversary, guys!

    Reblogged from: nezumiko
  11. seoulmama:

    thebaptizedagnostic:

    innerchrist:

    Today is the International Day Against Homophobia. Let’s use it to fight against heterosexism, transphobia, cissexism, and all other forms of oppression. 

    :D GUYS. GUYYYYS. ASEXUALLLLSSS. OUR FLAG WAS INCLUDED! 

    Reblogged from: serpencexalloid
  12. alissamariet:

    I like how NPH just legit looked around for something to hammer.

    Reblogged from: sexylipscar
  13. vampishly:

GPOY ;_____;

    vampishly:

    GPOY ;_____;

    Reblogged from: vampishly
  14. amillionmilesaway00:

    nerdydyke:

    afterellen:

    More gay snacks!

    I want that poptart. :3

    i love it, i’m so glad this is happening.

    Reblogged from: hangeyzoe
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